What is the difference between a well-heeled amateur who may still present a slight danger to the well-being of everyone around himevery time he picks up acrossbow andan expert who should be giving serious consideration topitching a new reality TV show idea?The latter is already intensely familiar with each of the following seven ultimate tips for becoming the ultimate crossbow hunter.So if any of the following tips are the least bit mysterious to you, you should probably put off trying to sell that idea of having our own show.

What is the difference between a well-heeled amateur who may still present a slight danger to the well-being of everyone around himevery time he picks up acrossbow andan expert who should be giving serious consideration topitching a new reality TV show idea?The latter is already intensely familiar with each of the following seven ultimate tips for becoming the ultimate crossbow hunter.So if any of the following tips are the least bit mysterious to you, you should probably put off trying to sell that idea of having our own show.

1. Real Men Use Cocking Devices

Of course, you know that using a cocking device is an aspect of the sport that has absolutely nothing to do with measuring strength, testosterone, manhood or womanhood. Those elements simply do not enter in the woods when the name of the game is about pulling 150 pounds of draw weight back without delay or incident. Far more important that existing as a test of strength is the ability of a cocking device to separate smart hunters from those you want to keep a close eye upon. The cocking device is not just about drawing back weight, after all, it also improves accuracy and gets you much closer to perfect tension consistency.

2. Guard Your String with Your Life

Should you ever actually have to depend upon the string of your crossbow for your life, you will be glad that you have behind you a long history of routinely making sure it is clean and free from wear and tear. The cumulative effects of allowing your dirt to build up on your string is an increase in the adverse effects of friction. That friction can result not just from the muck and crud out there in the wilderness, but also from the process of transportation from one place to another. You can reduce the effects of this kind of dirt accumulation by always storing your crossbow securely when not actually in use. As for the muck and crud, the first step is giving the cables a thorough cleaning after not just every hunt, but also every time you take the bow out for a practice round. Further precautions can be taken by using high quality wax on the strings and lubrication on the rail. How often to take this step will depend on the specific conditions of use, of course, but aim for somewhere between every 75 to 100 shots or so. One word of warning with this tip: overly generous lubrication of the rail will eventually permeate the serving, thus the length of its use.

3. All Good Things Must be Replaced

The crossbow hunter can easily become too attached to strings and cables that appear to be in perfect working condition and as a result put off replacing them for too long. It is a simple fact of life that even the best strings and cables are going to suffer to the point of replacement at some point in the future. It would be really useful if that point in the future were impossible to miss, but the fact is that there is single obvious sign blaring an alarm and shining a bright light into the sky that spells out now is the time to replace your strings and cable. Not that you can’t stay ahead of the game by looking for certain indications of trouble to come. Fraying of the strings or cable or both is definitely a sign that replacement time is coming up soon. Separation of the center serving to the point that the bowstring becomes visible is certainly another. Of course, you could always opt not to wait for any signs of wear and tear and simply mark a date on the calendar that every year becomes the day you replace your strings and cables. If your crossbow use is much less frequent that hardcore hunters, you may be able to get by with a replacement date that you observe every two or three years or more. The important thing is to commit to replacing both strings and cables at the same. Otherwise, the stretching that occurs naturally over time will be slightly off one or the other.

4. Get Your Law Degree

Okay, not an actual law degree, but you will definitely not hurt your chances as becoming the ultimate crossbow hunter if you become so familiar with every state regulation regarding the sport that you could pass that part of the bar. Start by focusing on the single most important elements: are there restrictions on where, when, how and why you can use a crossbow. Just because your home state allows you to go hunting on Christmas with a crossbow doesn’t necessarily mean that the same laws apply two borders over. If everything is cool regarding the when and where and the how, check for legal loopholes regarding the actual bow itself. You never know when you’re going to wind up somewhere with a weird limitation on draw weight minimums, a ban on mechanical heads and even a seemingly complete oversight on any mention of crossbows. When that seems to be the case, don’t assume it’s open season. Instead, check for general regulations on archery.

5. Stability, Stability, Stability

What’s the three most important things about improving accuracy with a crossbow? Stability, stability, stability. Start with a cocking device, then make sure to keep the strings and cables clean and, perhaps most importantly, use some sort of rest. It can be a shooting rail, sticks, pods, detachable monopods, telescoping legs, swivel heads or anything that contributes to stability. Just make sure you create a stable situation somehow.

6. Optical Illusion

The great illusion when it comes to optics and crossbow hunting is that a master can make do with any mounted sighting system. Maybe one in a million possess the magic ability to maintain accuracy when using a crossbow mounted with a sight not specifically intended for such equipment. Most hunters can get by quite nicely with a multi-reticle scope offering three dots or horizontal crosshairs. The four-crosshair multi-reticle scope is really much better suited for bows offering super-high-speed capacity.

7. Practice Makes Perfect

You want to become the ultimate crossbow hunter? Go hunting every chance you can. And when you can’t hit the practice range. The only way to become better is by not allowing the bow to collect dust and not allowing the skills you acquire and improve each time you use it to grow even dustier through non-use.

Enter your text here...

Enter your text here...

What is the difference between a well-heeled amateur who may still present a slight danger to the well-being of everyone around himevery time he picks up acrossbow andan expert who should be giving serious consideration topitching a new reality TV show idea?The latter is already intensely familiar with each of the following seven ultimate tips for becoming the ultimate crossbow hunter.So if any of the following tips are the least bit mysterious to you, you should probably put off trying to sell that idea of having our own show.

1. Real Men Use Cocking Devices

Of course, you know that using a cocking device is an aspect of the sport that has absolutely nothing to do with measuring strength, testosterone, manhood or womanhood. Those elements simply do not enter in the woods when the name of the game is about pulling 150 pounds of draw weight back without delay or incident. Far more important that existing as a test of strength is the ability of a cocking device to separate smart hunters from those you want to keep a close eye upon. The cocking device is not just about drawing back weight, after all, it also improves accuracy and gets you much closer to perfect tension consistency.
Crossbow Hunting in South Africa

2. Guard Your String with Your Life

Should you ever actually have to depend upon the string of your crossbow for your life, you will be glad that you have behind you a long history of routinely making sure it is clean and free from wear and tear. The cumulative effects of allowing your dirt to build up on your string is an increase in the adverse effects of friction.

That friction can result not just from the muck and crud out there in the wilderness, but also from the process of transportation from one place to another. You can reduce the effects of this kind of dirt accumulation by always storing your crossbow securely when not actually in use. As for the muck and crud, the first step is giving the cables a thorough cleaning after not just every hunt, but also every time you take the bow out for a practice round.

Further precautions can be taken by using high quality wax on the strings and lubrication on the rail. How often to take this step will depend on the specific conditions of use, of course, but aim for somewhere between every 75 to 100 shots or so. One word of warning with this tip: overly generous lubrication of the rail will eventually permeate the serving, thus the length of its use.

3. All Good Things Must be Replaced

The crossbow hunter can easily become too attached to strings and cables that appear to be in perfect working condition and as a result put off replacing them for too long. It is a simple fact of life that even the best strings and cables are going to suffer to the point of replacement at some point in the future. It would be really useful if that point in the future were impossible to miss, but the fact is that there is single obvious sign blaring an alarm and shining a bright light into the sky that spells out now is the time to replace your strings and cable.

Not that you can’t stay ahead of the game by looking for certain indications of trouble to come. Fraying of the strings or cable or both is definitely a sign that replacement time is coming up soon. Separation of the center serving to the point that the bowstring becomes visible is certainly another.

Of course, you could always opt not to wait for any signs of wear and tear and simply mark a date on the calendar that every year becomes the day you replace your strings and cables. If your crossbow use is much less frequent that hardcore hunters, you may be able to get by with a replacement date that you observe every two or three years or more. The important thing is to commit to replacing both strings and cables at the same. Otherwise, the stretching that occurs naturally over time will be slightly off one or the other.
Pieball Ossabaw doe taken with Horton Super Max 175 Crossbow

4. Get Your Law Degree

Okay, not an actual law degree, but you will definitely not hurt your chances as becoming the ultimate crossbow hunter if you become so familiar with every state regulation regarding the sport that you could pass that part of the bar. Start by focusing on the single most important elements: are there restrictions on where, when, how and why you can use a crossbow. Just because your home state allows you to go hunting on Christmas with a crossbow doesn’t necessarily mean that the same laws apply two borders over.

If everything is cool regarding the when and where and the how, check for legal loopholes regarding the actual bow itself. You never know when you’re going to wind up somewhere with a weird limitation on draw weight minimums, a ban on mechanical heads and even a seemingly complete oversight on any mention of crossbows. When that seems to be the case, don’t assume it’s open season. Instead, check for general regulations on archery.

5. Stability, Stability, Stability

What’s the three most important things about improving accuracy with a crossbow? Stability, stability, stability. Start with a cocking device, then make sure to keep the strings and cables clean and, perhaps most importantly, use some sort of rest. It can be a shooting rail, sticks, pods, detachable monopods, telescoping legs, swivel heads or anything that contributes to stability. Just make sure you create a stable situation somehow.

6. Optical Illusion

The great illusion when it comes to optics and crossbow hunting is that a master can make do with any mounted sighting system. Maybe one in a million possess the magic ability to maintain accuracy when using a crossbow mounted with a sight not specifically intended for such equipment. Most hunters can get by quite nicely with a multi-reticle scope offering three dots or horizontal crosshairs. The four-crosshair multi-reticle scope is really much better suited for bows offering super-high-speed capacity.

Crossbow hunting with Bushmen Safaris

7. Practice Makes Perfect

You want to become the ultimate crossbow hunter? Go hunting every chance you can. And when you can’t hit the practice range. The only way to become better is by not allowing the bow to collect dust and not allowing the skills you acquire and improve each time you use it to grow even dustier through non-use.

Click Here to Leave a Comment Below 0 comments